Scoops in Georgia

Today my friend Tom and I drove up to Brunswick, Georgia to do another demo for the Golden Isles Woodturners. We’re going to start trading occasional demos, so that both clubs can get a greater variety of demos and have some fresh faces every once in awhile.

One significant difference is that the Golden Isles club allows nearly 2 ½ hours for the demo, while the Northeast Florida Woodturners only can allow one hour. This gave me a chance to demo three different styles of scoop.

Several different styles of scoops

Several different styles of scoops

I started with the Raffan style scoop, which was the easiest. These are the scoops on the right. This scoop starts by turning a simple cylinder and then forming a cup shape on the end. The cup is then hollowed out. I use a spindle gouge for this, but other hollowing techniques can be used. A little scraping of the interior finishes off the cup.

Raffan Scoop, turning the handle

Raffan Scoop, turning the handle

The handle is then turned, but to actually create the scoop, you need to bandsaw a curve in the cup to open it up. A little sanding and it’s ready to go.

The second style was the Nick Cook coffee scoop. This is a two piece scoop, composed of a cup and a separate handle that is glued in with a tenon into a hole drilled in the cup. The cup on this scoop is smaller than the Raffan style and has a more rounded shape, but the processes to turn and hollow the cup are identical. Since it’s smaller the hollowing is relatively easy, but as I was nearing the bottom I saw a little daylight. That was a problem since I had turned through the bottom. A bit embarrassing, but I had enough wood to quickly turn another cup and then make a jamb chuck so that I could finish the bottom.

Hollowing the cup on the Nick Cook scoop

Hollowing the cup on the Nick Cook scoop

I drilled a ¼ inch hole in the cup and then turned a slender handle, sizing the tenon to fit in the hole. A little CA glue and the scoop was done.

After a quick break I was on to the most ambitious scoop. While I decided not to do the regular Soren Berger multi axis scoop, I decided to make a longer one with an offset handle. This one was the most challenging since you initially turn the shape between centers, but then need to mount the sphere of the cup in a jamb chuck to hollow it out. This wouldn’t be so bad, except that the handle is spinning around like a propeller.

Step one is to turn a perfect sphere on the headstock end. This is a bit tricky and there are a number of ways to turn a sphere, but I have found that doing it by eye and checking the profile with a 1 ¼ inch copper coupling. By running the coupling on the surface, you can note and places where the coupling doesn’t fit flush on the surface. Any gaps show you where you need to shave a little more from the surface. Sometimes this can be pretty challenging, but I’ve turned a number of spheres lately, so I was gratified that the process went smoothly and I got a good sphere.

Sphere is turned and now working on handle

Sphere is turned and now working on handle

I then offset the handle and turned a transition to the handle and then offset it once more tand finished the handle. Once I sawed the sphere free, I sanded the end of the sphere true and smooth. Then it was a matter of fitting it into the jamb chuck. I had brought three conventional jamb chucks and two adjustable ones that I made to fit on regular scroll chucks. I was very lucky in that the sphere fit perfectly into one of the jamb chucks I brought and a few whacks and the sphere was firmly seated in the chuck.

Scoop in jamb chuck - what out for the spinning handle

Scoop in jamb chuck – what out for the spinning handle

With the handle flying around I was able to hollow the sphere. I had a catch that caused the jamb chuck to shift which required me to do some redesign things a bit. After that though, I was able to hollow the rest without any problem. Only after I was done did I had remember that I had brought a Termite ring cutter to do the hollowing. That would have made the process easier rather than use the spindle gouge for the whole process.

I wished that everything had gone perfectly, but sometimes that’s just the way demos go. I think part of demonstrating is how you recover from a little mishap. I also generally practice before doing a demo, but I had just gotten a new lathe and only had it running yesterday, so no practice time.

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