Gene O'Donnell

Gene O'Donnell My first encounter with woodturning was in high school in shop class where I made a lamp for my mother.  After high school, I served my country in the U.S. Army as a helicopter pilot, and served in Vietnam in 1969.  I worked as an air traffic controller until 1981.  I attended medical school and became an anesthetist in 1989, and have worked in that profession in the Jacksonville, Florida area for 20 years.  I have considered myself a public servant to others, which is rewarding, but I still did not feel completely self-fulfilled.

In  2003, I was reintroduced to my love for woodturning by Dan Long, a friend and co-worker.  I loved the material of wood and wanted to maximize my creative and technical woodturning skills to enhance the beauty in wood.  At first, I began turning local woods like Florida red bay, camphor, and Norfolk Island pine.  I was inspired by members of my local woodturning club, and by professionals and demonstrators at the national club symposiums. They fed my creative instinct to experiment with other forms and woods, like redwood burls, African mahogany, and to experiment with coloring of wood.  I learned to use embellishments, such as pyrography, texturing, and carving to enhance the natural beauty of a piece.

My intent as an artist is to express my creative vision through the use of wood, and to use my technical skills to bring out its natural beauty for others to enjoy.  I want to develop a level of expertise so that I can give back to the woodturning community by sharing and teaching my woodturning techniques, which in turn, may inspire others to experience the great personal satisfaction of turning wood.

My first encounter with woodturning was in high school in shop class where I made a lamp for my mother. After high school, I served my country in the U.S. Army as a helicopter pilot, and served in Vietnam in 1969. I worked as an air traffic controller until 1981. I attended medical school and became an anesthetist in 1989, and have worked in that profession in the Jacksonville, Florida area for 20 years. I have considered myself a public servant to others, which is rewarding, but I still did not feel completely self-fulfilled.

In 2003, I was reintroduced to my love for woodturning by Dan Long, a friend and co-worker. I loved the material of wood and wanted to maximize my creative and technical woodturning skills to enhance the beauty in wood. At first, I began turning local woods like Florida red bay, camphor, and Norfolk Island pine. I was inspired by members of my local woodturning club, and by professionals and demonstrators at the national club symposiums. They fed my creative instinct to experiment with other forms and woods, like redwood burls, African mahogany, and to experiment with coloring of wood. I learned to use embellishments, such as pyrography, texturing, and carving to enhance the natural beauty of a piece.

My intent as an artist is to express my creative vision through the use of wood, and to use my technical skills to bring out its natural beauty for others to enjoy. I want to develop a level of expertise so that I can give back to the woodturning community by sharing and teaching my woodturning techniques, which in turn, may inspire others to experience the great personal satisfaction of turning wood.